The town that started the Civil War (Book, 1990) [Hayden Memorial Library @ Citrus College]
skip to content
The town that started the Civil War Preview this item
ClosePreview this item

The town that started the Civil War

Author: Nat Brandt
Publisher: Syracuse, N.Y. : Syracuse University Press, 1990.
Edition/Format:   Print book : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Summary:
Discusses the rescue of a kidnapped slave in 1858 by the residents of Oberlin, Ohio, and the repercussions.
You are not connected to the Hayden Memorial Library @ Citrus College network. Access to online content and services may require you to authenticate with your library. My Library Account Access
Getting this item's online copy... Getting this item's online copy...

Find a copy in the library

Getting this item's location and availability... Getting this item's location and availability...

WorldCat

Find it in libraries globally
Worldwide libraries own this item

Details

Genre/Form: History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Brandt, Nat.
Town that started the Civil War.
Syracuse, N.Y. : Syracuse University Press, 1990
(OCoLC)610570103
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Nat Brandt
ISBN: 081560243X 9780815602439
OCLC Number: 20632815
Description: xix, 315 pages : illustrations, map, portraits ; 24 cm
Contents: Illustrations --
Preface --
Acknowledgments --
Cast of characters --
The slave and the student --
The law --
"Nigger" town --
The man-stealers --
Ambush --
To the rescue --
The rescue --
"From snowy white to sooty" --
Legal maneuvers, politics as usual --
The case against the white clerk --
The case against the black schoolteacher --
"A common humanity" --
"Wightman's castle" --
The rally and the ruling --
"I was in prison, and ye came unto me" --
Aftermath --
Epilogue --
Notes --
Bibliography --
Index.
Responsibility: Nat Brandt.
Local System Bib Number:
1610475867688_134059
991000302529705351

Abstract:

The small college town of Oberlin, Ohio represented the most advanced of Northern attitudes toward the issue of slavery and states' rights. This narrative, based on thorough primary research, shows  Read more...
Retrieving notes about this item Retrieving notes about this item

Reviews

User-contributed reviews

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.