Indian slave trade in the Southwest : a study of slave-taking and the traffic in Indian captives (Book, 1966) [Hayden Memorial Library @ Citrus College]
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Indian slave trade in the Southwest : a study of slave-taking and the traffic in Indian captives

Author: Lynn R Bailey; James H. Sutton Jr. and Sylvia Leal Carvajal Collection.
Publisher: Los Angeles : Westernlore Press, 1966.
Series: Great West and Indian series, 32.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
With the Spanish entrada into the arid Southwest came the seeds of a commerce that would germinate and grow into a menace to be felt for over 300 years-- the trade in Indian slaves and captives. Unable to control and Christianize the less sedentary tribes, such as the Apaches, Utes, Paiutes, and Navajos, the early Spanish settlers sought instead to subjugate them by a systematic program of bondage. Into the mines of  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Bailey, Lynn Robison, 1937-
Indian slave trade in the Southwest.
Los Angeles, Westernlore Press, 1966
(OCoLC)609348344
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Lynn R Bailey; James H. Sutton Jr. and Sylvia Leal Carvajal Collection.
OCLC Number: 944213
Description: xvi, 236 pages : illustrations, map (on lining papers) portraits ; 22 cm.
Contents: Introduction --
Plunder trails southward --
Slave raiding and the Navajo Wars, 1700-1885 --
Slave raiders in the Great Basin --
Victory over tradition --
Appendix.
Series Title: Great West and Indian series, 32.
Responsibility: by L.R. Bailey.
Local System Bib Number:
1610475867688_633277
991000108559705351

Abstract:

With the Spanish entrada into the arid Southwest came the seeds of a commerce that would germinate and grow into a menace to be felt for over 300 years-- the trade in Indian slaves and captives. Unable to control and Christianize the less sedentary tribes, such as the Apaches, Utes, Paiutes, and Navajos, the early Spanish settlers sought instead to subjugate them by a systematic program of bondage. Into the mines of northern Mexico and to the estates of the landed gentry of New Mexico went thousands of Indians, to spend their lives in hopeless toil. With inevitable vengeance the Indians turned against the newcomers. For five hundred miles into Mexico, Apaches and Comanche warriors cut a path of destruction. In New Mexico the Navajos stubbornly fought against Spanish encroachment; and successfully restricted the course of westward expansion and, with the advent of the reciprocal trade in captives and slaves-- both Red and White-- came seemingly endless decades of frontier warfare and political turmoil, which did not cease until long after the appearance of the Anglo-Americans. From the National Archives, various historical repositories, both in the United States and Mexico, documented evidence bearing directly upon the source of the slave traffic is here brought together in book form. Here for the first time we have a clear picture of the effects of this nefarious commerce, which plagued the American West, and caused centuries of tribal warfare -- Book jacket.
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